Poetry Prompt: Remixing the Web [Style Guide]

web style guide 3

This post is part of a series of weekly found poetry prompts. If you have an idea for a found poetry source, email Senior Poetry Editor Beth Ayer. The above image is a screenshot from the Web Style Guide


The Web Style Guide (3rd edition) by Patrick Lynch and Sarah Horton can be a helpful reference for web editors and the like. The authors set out to ” inspire us to strive for universal usability.” Let’s extend this work’s use a bit further and remix its guiding words into something unexpected. The authors talk about helping to orient web users and guiding them towards “closure” (ending up in the place they wanted or expected to go).  How different is poetry in both process and effect? Maybe poetry guides readers through disorientation towards a place they didn’t know they wanted to go.

Remix or erase the text of the Web Style Guide in the manner of your choosing. As always, please share the results in the comments.

5 Comments

  • June 5, 2014

    5-Track

    *Will not engage the eye. Will not engage the eye.*

    Particularly large blocks of color-blind preferences
    identify all important users.
    The time-honored key to effective emphasis:
    Contrasts in body shape convention attract the eye.

    *Will not engage the eye. Will not engage the eye.*

    If you want them to be large, increase their size by one measure.

    If you prefer bold, make them bold.

    Look any way you choose.

    Engage the eye. *Will not engage the eye.* Engage the eye. *Will not engage the eye.*

    Draw attention to the display,
    the overall shape formed with distinctive colors of blue and violet.
    Isolate it to vary the relative importance, the semantic meaning
    (a subtle means to distinguish a comparably sized aesthetic because).
    Notice how much harder it is to separate any tiring weight.
    You can add cascading context and meaning and style at the same time.

    THE DESIGN OF THE AUDIENCE’S NEEDS WILL DETERMINE WHAT YOU WISH TO SAY.

    Engage the eye.

    Engage the eye.

    *Eye engage the will.*

  • June 5, 2014

    like an apple

    […] its (somewhat horrifyingly bland) vision of the Universal Reader on the World Wide Web. From a prompt at Found Poetry […]

  • June 5, 2014

    Jessica

    “I wove my webs for you because I liked you.”

    Seemingly disparate audiences
    Calm, reassuring, and practical guidance
    A welcome relief from the esoteric

    Prefer the standard to the offbeat
    Degrade gracefully
    Do not explain too much

    Far more flexible than the built world
    This reality imposes limits
    Memory dedicated to each pixel

    Small lapses can erode the ethos
    The way a stranger might
    Text is the most widely accessible content
    Content may be out of reach

  • June 6, 2014

    Lewis Oakwood

    The World Computing-Exploding

    A confetti of explorers and builders
    presented to an open landscape of novel changes,
    without boundaries or limitations.

    ~

    (The words used to create the poem were taken from the preface to the Web Style Guide)

    http://wp.me/4EYl2

    • June 6, 2014

      Lewis Oakwood

      Individual words were rearranged to create new sentences.

      ~