Finders Keepers: Reactions

ReactionFeature

By News & Resources Editor Martin Elwell. Send me your found poetry news.


Reactions

Last week I mentioned Kenneth Goldsmith’s performance of his conceptual poem “The Body of Michael Brown.” Goldsmith’s choice to appropriate the content of Michael Brown’s autopsy document has triggered many strong reactions. Here are some that stood out:

Did you write a reaction or find one particularly poignant? Post a link in the comments below.

Blackout Poetry

Are you in the Pittsburgh area? Do you like using sharpies to black out the pages of old books? If you answered yes to these questions, check out the Bridgeville Public Library’s Blackout Poetry event on March 28th!

A program at Bridgeville Public Library, called “Blackout Poetry,” will allow participants to put Sharpies to the pages of old books. With each bold stroke, they’ll use the remaining words to compose a poem, using someone else’s words.

Fruits and Flowers and Animals and Seas and Lands Do Open

LeongThe winner of the 2014 Burnside Review Chapbook Contest, chosen by Hannah Gamble, was FPR friend and Pulitzer Remix participant, Michael Leong. Leong’s chapbook contains poems written as part of the Pulitzer Prize project, and you can grab a copy here.

Michael Leong’s vocabulary is totally stuffed/ multiplying in mirrors/ scattered over hillsides/ bubbling right over the top, and he’s going to give it all to you—he’s generous. He’s generous and funny and a little troubled—and “a little troubled” is, of course, the most logical and authentic response we could hope for anyone who’s examining life and poetry and personhood and artist-ness. This book is so enjoyable—like I said, giving and funny, but also very unlike anything I’ve read lately. It promptly wins the reader over.

4 Comments

  • March 22, 2015

    Lewis Oakwood

    To say something about plagiarism —

    ~ ~ ~

    Concerning Authorship

    Copied reframes: miniatures
    behind the madhouses,
    they surreptitiously become
    exploration —
    discords with sequels
    expressed as
    plagiaristic interchange.

    ~ ~ ~

  • March 22, 2015

    Lewis Oakwood

    Promoting an Unauthentic Readjustment

    Meaning is forged: the merging of cliché
    with emotionalism — you raise an eyebrow,
    unconvincingly.

    Imagined-authentic: the dawn and dusk
    of cut-and-paste; a patchwork disfigurement.

    You, follower of the light of your fabrications;
    globetrotter of a fabled-fairground.

    ~ ~ ~

  • March 22, 2015

    Lewis Oakwood

    The Yell of the Plagiarist is Full of Thistles

    The tortured conceptualizing of
    an intentional peddler of works
    unoriginal. Played
    on the Internet-zither
    in a garden grown wild.
    Hear: the yell of the plagiarist
    is full of thistles.

    ~ ~ ~

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