Finders Keepers: Interstellar Bouquet

BouquetFeature

By News & Resources Editor Martin Elwell. Send me your found poetry news.


Poetry of Natalie Czech

CzechDerek Beaulieu discusses the poetry of Natalie Czech at Coldfront. Embedded Frank O’Hara poems, literary archaeology, what’s not to like?

Berlin’s Natalie Czech creates limit case pieces that point to the end of erasure texts, each piece a seemingly impossible conjuring of texts within texts. Czech’s Je n’ai rien à dire. Seulement à montrer. / Ich habe nichts zu sagen. Nur zu zeigen. / I have nothing to say. Only to show (Spector Books, 2012) is an awe-inspiring book of literary conjuring. I have nothing to say. Only to show places text-based visual poems within larger textual fields, embedding them into the margin-to-margin written from which they assert themselves.

Poetry of Bob Brown

Get your “language lessons” dive into the history of experimental poetry at Hyperallergic.

Certainly there is not a better example of the manipulation of “found poetry” in existence. And once again, Brown has made good use of popular genres in order to create radical experiments. Perhaps his most radical experimentation had less to do with the actual texts used as with how that language was presented and disseminated.

Pepys Diary Erasure Project

Experience the ups and downs of a marathon erasure project as Dave Bonta enters the third year of his erasure of the Diary of Samuel Pepys.

It’s teaching me a lot about invention and discovery, the observer effect, and the shadow text—which, like a shadow government, thrives on its own irrelevance. Within a few months of beginning the project, I switched to a fully digital style of erasure using HTML. And in the latter half of 2014, I began to use erasure to teach myself how to compose better haiku — one of the most difficult kinds of poetry to get right.

Sampling NASA

NASAHow do you get space music? You sample NASA. Get your interstellar appropriation here.

80 UA was created from the Sound Archive published by NASA. The five composers sampled, processed, reconstructed and synthesised the original sources. The tracks are crafted exclusively from the original recordings of NASA—the only rule the musicians gave themselves.

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